Discussion:
Emergency Oxygen!!
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a***@gmail.com
2015-07-26 13:58:47 UTC
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Come visit our web site to see the NEW powdered emergency oxygen system
called emOx.....it's lightweight, portable, non-flammable,
non-combustible, non-pressurized, non-corrosive and maintenance free.
.....recently made available in the US....
http://www.emox.com
OXYGEN IS LIVE.....DON'T PRESSURIZE IT!!
it's a good product. but what about heat, since it is an exothermic reaction, what is the amount of heat generated and rise in temperature of water
a***@gmail.com
2015-07-26 14:01:12 UTC
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Come visit our web site to see the NEW powdered emergency oxygen
system
called emOx.....it's lightweight, portable, non-flammable,
non-combustible, non-pressurized, non-corrosive and maintenance
free.
.....recently made available in the US....
http://www.emox.com
OXYGEN IS LIVE.....DON'T PRESSURIZE IT!!
Shipped to you directly on ValueJet Airlines, no doubt. Allow for
some delays in transit.
Steve Harris, M.D.Very
cute.....this is in NO way similiar to the oxygen generators which
exploded on ValuJet.....
The product has been featured on Beyond 2000 on the Discovery
Channel...
the regulatory consultant that had this cleared for marketing by FDA is
the person that wrote just about all the code for FDA in regards to
oxygen devices.....most of us in our company are physicians..... due
diligence might be suggested before a glib remark...
Harold Jaynes
MedTrak International
410.381.6488 Voice
410.381.7670 Fax
"Due diligence"? From a twerp who talks about an oxygen system being
"non-combustable"? That leaves the impression that the thing is not a
fire-hazzard, which of course is incorrect. A case of a statement which
is strictly true being used to lie by implication, like the label that
says that coconut oil is cholesterol free. With advertising like this
as your introduction, I wouldn't buy one of your devices even if the
only alternative was a whiff of limburger.
Steve Harris, M.D.
The active chemical ingredient in the emOx device is sodium
percarbonate. This substance is composed of 1 mole of sodium carbonate
(Na2CO3) and 2 moles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Like its main
ingredient, hydrogen peroxide, and many other chemicals available for
general household use (e.g. bleach, hypochlorite), sodium percarbonate
is a strong oxidant. An oxidant is a substance that either adds oxygen
or removes hydrogen from another substance. This process is termed
oxidation. Oxidation should not be confused with combustion. Combustion
is used to describe the oxidation of organic materials whose end
products are CO2 and H2O. Not all oxidations can be classified as
combustions. For example, the rusting of iron is oxidation but not
combustion.
Distinction must be made between a combustible substance and one which
supports combustion. A substance which supplies the oxygen necessary for
combustion, supports combustion. Sodium percarbonate may be considered
to support combustion since it produces oxygen as it decomposes in the
presence of water. For this reason, sodium percarbonate should not be
stored in contact with combustible materials such as paper and wood.
The rate of oxidation of a substance varies with the substance's
chemical nature and environmental conditions. In lay terms, substances
which undergo rapid, almost instantaneous oxidation are referred to as
flammable. Inadvertent combustion of such substances can result in fire
or explosion, depending on the rate of oxidation. In a fire, oxidation
occurs slowly: in an explosion, there is a detonation in which oxidation
is nearly instantenous and the by-products and energy evolved are
dissipated rapidly. Again, the rusting of iron may be used as an example
of oxidation that cannot be classified as combustion, and therefore, by
definition cannot be either flammable or explosive.
Sodium percarbonate, in the presence of water, decomposes into sodium
carbonate, water and oxygen. Because gas is evolved, the rate of this
reaction is a function of temperature and pressure. The end product,
sodium carbonate, occurs in nature.
Our search on the chemical product (CAS Number 15630-89-4) shows it to
be non-explosive and environmentally safe. The OHS MSDS Summary Sheet
clearly states "No fire hazard. This material is an oxidizer." Since
sodium percarbonate is not combustible, by definition it cannot be
either flammable or explosive.
The catalyst, manganese dioxide, occurs in nature as pyrolusite. The
substance is readily soluble in water, is not caustic, is not an
oxidant, is not combustible, does not suport comsution, and is neither
flammable nor explosive.
I hope this explanation clears thing up on the technical end of the
product.....
Hello

Since it is an exothermic reaction, please help me in figuring out the amount of heat generated and rise in temperature of water when sodium percarbonate is dissolved in water
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